Game of Thrones: Season 4, Episode 3

captainofalltheships:

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Chrys watches GoT [x]

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#got  

creepyasha:

i hope they change the actor for daario naharis every season for absolutely no reason and with no explanation given

#got  

ariannenymeros:

Why D&D can’t write woman part two(x)

Show!Asha(still in denial of “Yara”)

  • is reduced to the stereotype of a “bitchy tomboy”.
  • d&d think that the viewers are so dumb enough to mix a wildling woman up with an ironborn princess.
  • the one and only glorious gemma whelan being the only comfort of this role.
  • waste of wonderful canon!characte.
  • repeatedly insults theon by calling him a cunt.
  • bullies theon all the time for the sake of it.
  • not enough screentime or character development, when we get scenes with random whores who needn’t be there.
  • doesn’t show much of her softer side until season 3, but she is only in season 3 for like 5 minutes.
  • isn’t nearly as badass as her book counterpart until season .
  • No but what the fuck is a Yara though?

Book!Asha

  • is a motherfucking q u e e n.
  • doesn’t care about husbands, wants adventures instead.
  • is married to her axe, and her dirk is her suckling babe.
  • doesn’t let anyone tell her she can’t do anything(kingsmoot anyone?).
  • is a real heartbreaker.
  • hates the word cunt.
  • is not a “proper lady wishing for a husband and children”, yet she still stands up for her own sex; something which the showrunners see as a myth.
  • nr1 badass gangsta biatch 101.
  • loves pretty boys, and they love her even more.
  • totally confident with her sexuality, and takes no shit for it.
  • despite being the n1 badass gangsta biatch, she is kind, witty, clever and takes no shit.
  • never lets anyone bring her down for being a woman.
  • is a developed and interesting character who breaks stereotypes.

Oberyn Nymeros Martell, Tyrion muttered under his breath as he fell in beside the man. The Red Viper of Dorne. And what in the seven hells am I supposed to do with him? He knew the man only by reputation, to be sure… but the reputation was fearsome. When he was no more than sixteen, Prince Oberyn had been found abed with the paramour of old Lord Yronwood, a huge man of fierce repute and short temper. A duel ensued, though in view of the prince’s youth and high birth, it was only to first blood. Both men took cuts, and honor was satisfied. Yet Prince Oberyn soon recovered, while Lord Yronwood’s wounds festered and killed him. Afterward men whispered that Oberyn had fought with a poisoned sword, and ever thereafter friends and foes alike called him the Red Viper. 

#oberyn martell   #got  

"

It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. Rape is a tricky thing to use as character development, for either the victim or the rapist; doing it twice raises a lot of red flags. It assumes that rape between characters doesn’t fundamentally change the rest of their story—and it assumes that the difference between consent and rape is, to use the parlance, a “blurred line.”

Unfortunately, the show is wrong, on both counts. Changing a scene from consensual sex to rape is not just a pedantic issue of accuracy—it’s a problem with story. The Daenerys Targaryen who falls in love with a man who granted her respect when no one else would is different from the Daenerys Targaryen who fell in love with her rapist. It changes that relationship. (Dany falling in love with Drogo, and calling him her “sun and stars,” makes a whole lot more sense now, doesn’t it?)

Similarly, Jaime is a figure of chivalric love in the books—despite his arrogance and ruthlessness, his devotion and sense of duty to Cersei, the only woman he has ever loved, is so fervent as to border on adoration. Admittedly, the show can’t rely on his point-of-view chapters, as the book does, to communicate that love. But given what we have seen Cersei Lannister capable of—her ex-husband is hardly the only man she’s had killed—is it even conceivable that she would stand for it? Jaime raping Cersei is a major anomaly for these two characters—even based purely on what we’ve seen in the show. It’s just not something that either character would do.

"

—Sonia Saraiya, Rape of Thrones: Why are the Game of Thrones showrunners rewriting the books into misogyny? (via stannisbaratheon)
#got   #got spoilers   #meta   #YES!  

Why David Benioff and D.B. Weiss raped Cersei Lannister

thusspakekate:

Much has already been written about Sunday’s controversial episode of Game of Thrones. The episode itself was actually rather dull—a lot of exposition and little action—but one particular scene has already garnered thousands of keystrokes, hundreds of outraged tweets, and dozens of confused attempts at rationalization. Viewers will no doubt know exactly what scene I mean.

In the Great Sept, next to the dead body of their first born son, Jaime Lannister rapes his sister, the mother of his three children.

 Immediately after this scene aired, fans were at their keyboards crying foul. Jaime Lannister would never! That’s not how it happened in the book! How could they?

I had waited anxiously for that scene. In the books, it was the first time Jaime and Cersei were reunited since he went off to war. It was an emotional, passionate, and bloody (period sex, fuck yeah) reunion. I assumed it wouldn’t happen since Jaime returned early on the show’s timeline and their reunion was less than enthusiastic. I was wary when they revealed that Jaime has been back for two weeks on the show’s timeline and they still hadn’t had sex. In the books, they were fucking within a matter of minutes.

“Hurry,” she was whispering now, “quickly, quickly, now, do it now, do me now. JaimeJaime Jaime.” Her hands helped guide him.“Yes,” Cersei said as he thrust, “my brother, sweet brother, yes, like that, yes, I have you, you’re home now, you’re home now, you’re home.” She kissed his ear and stroked his short bristly hair. Jaime lost himself in her flesh. He could feel Cersei’s heart beating in time with his own, and the wetness of blood and seed where they were joined.

Imagine my surprise when Jaime shows up to visit Cersei in the Sept then. Excitement stole through me. They were going to be true to the story after all. This would be their reconciliation, their grief would bring them together. They would fuck on the altar of their dead son as he lies in state, and then Jaime would try to convince her to run away with him, to live as husband and wife, to replace their murdered son with new, trueborn children, just as he had in the books.

Instead, he rapes her. Instead of guiding him inside her, she is forced onto the ground and begs him to stop. Instead of futility trying to convince her to join him in a folie à deux where they can have their happily ever after, he calls her hateful. He growls that the gods have made him love a hateful woman. And then he rapes her.

Immediately fans pointed out how completely out of character this was for him. Jaime loves Cersei. Jaime has devoted his entire life to caring for her, to protecting her, to enabling her every whim. Not only that, he is decidedly not a rapist. In a country where rape and murder are so common they’re expected, Jaime Lannister stands out as a man who actually…doesn’t do it. Just the season before, he shields Brienne of Tarth from the grisly fate when they’re captured by Vargo Hoat’s men. He doesn’t rape, he doesn’t whore, he doesn’t even sleep around. He is utterly devoted to his sister-lover.

So why does he do it on the show? Better yet, why do D&D have him do it when it seems to go against all of the careful and painful character development he received in the last season? How does Jaime go from protecting Brienne of Tarth from gang rape and jumping into a pit to save her from a bear, to raping the woman he has devoted the last forty years of his life to?

As many fans pointed out: Just what happened to that inspirational redemption arc of his? How could they possibly think this was in character?

I think the key to this mystery is in the dialogue:

"You are a hateful woman. Why have the gods made me love such a hateful woman?" 

The rape scene is tangential to Jaime’s “redemption arc” in that it is Cersei’s punishment for making him need redemption in the first place.

We know how hard Jaime’s had it, how everyone mocks and hates him for the impossible choice he made when he earned his nickname, Kingslayer. We know he’d given up being honorable because no one saw him as honorable. And, because of his relationship with Brienne, we know that, deep down, under the gold cloak and the shiny hair and attempted murder of a child. All he ever wanted to be was a knight like Ser Arthur Dayne, the Sword of the He’s really just a noble guy whose been lead astray.

And whose fault is that?

David Beniodd and D.B. Weiss say it’s Cersei’s fault. Not explicitly. At least, not yet. But that’s why the sex scene in the Sept became the rape scene in the sept. That’s why, despite hundreds of pages of painstaking character development that make it entirely illogical for that to happen, they wrote it that way for television. 

Because on the King’s Road with Brienne, Jaime was beginning to get in touch with the boy-knight still inside himself, the one who still believed in the words he said. Her honor made him want to be more honorable too. But now he’s back in King’s Landing, outside of Brienne’s sphere of good influence and back in Cersei’s corrupting one. Instead of welcoming Jaime home with open legs, D&D’s Cersei is standoffish and unresponsive.

He stands in the previous episode, pathetically pleading for a modicum of her affection, but she spurns him, telling him he’s too late, that things have changed. D&D’s Cersei cares not a whit for Jaime, though he has devoted his whole life to her, has allowed her to mold him into the man who stands before her. And what better way to show how corrupting she is, than to have that love turned against her?

The show uses rape as Cersei’s comeuppance, her poetic justice for tainting the honorable Jaime’s good honor. That’s why the show’s writers didn’t see it as an out of character action, because Jaime isn’t Jaime when he’s with Cersei, he’s just some pitiful victim of her machinations. When he assaults her, she’s only reaping what she sowed.

I don’t think I have to explain why this is a fucked up, misogynistic, and ethically wrong narrative choice, do I?

The god’s may have made Jaime love a hateful woman, but D&D were the ones who made him rape her. 

#got   #got spoilers   #spoilers   #tw: rape   #long post   #text post  
#Arya Stark   #sandor clegane   #got  

Anonymous asked: hi, i was just wondering what your thoughts were on how d&d fucked up the altar sex scene. i know you've been anticipating it, so i was just curious.

queencersei:

Do I even have thoughts at this point? Is it a thing that really happened or a prank, we just don’t know. It’s just really sad because with one hit the show literally assassinated both Jaime and Cersei’s characters, used rape as a plot device, robbed a female of her agency, pandered to their bad vs good boner and used bad writing for it. I don’t even know where to begin, because I am trying to see it from a different angle. Like, as a book reader, it isn’t hard to see that there are many things in common with the original scene. Hell, I loved 95% of the whole scene as a whole, I think it was brilliant and the acting was incredible. Overall, I really hoped they might get it right after all. But then those last five seconds literally ruined everything. By taking away Cersei’s agency they rob the character of something that is entirely hers, something that defines the character entirely. Cersei’s use of her sexuality along with the use of her influence is one of the most important parts of Cersei, and I am not really sure who I am looking at. It is certainly not my Cersei. Once again we look at a character being abused by a couple of dudebros who think rape is a good way to show weakness. I don’t know if this is part of D&D’s terrific plan to Make Cersei Likeable, but it’s not acceptable. Cersei literally says no when Jaime is inside her, while in the books she is the one to guide his movements. Originally, she is the one to initiate contact, to seek his proximity, while D&D seem to think it a-okay to offer a lamb up for slaughter, in the name of their own agenda. Be it to show the Lannisters are the sick bad guys, or to cast a shadow ovr Jaime and Cersei’s relationship, I don’t care, they did it in the more cowardly possible way.

This is not my show. And these are really not my characters. Don’t get me started on the 765789 ways and reason in and for which Jaime Lannister would never rape anyone because he is the opposite of all HBO showed us tonight. They built up a Jaime Lannister only to demolish everything he stands for, and I find it offensive as a viewer. It’s like they’re treating me like the most stupid person in the world. As a book reader, I am even more furious, because they know this is not what it was supposed to be like.

And to add to the ridiculousness, now both writers and director and actors say it’s not rape, and consensual eventually (lmao what the fuck does that even mean) because they know they fucked up, god they know so bad and they’ll know even worse in the morning when feedback starts coming in. They perpetrate the lack of consent as not rape, trying to give in a free pass as they always enjoyed power-play so it is bound to turn them on (I quote loosely what Alex Graves said about the episode). Now, Alex Graves, thank you for this impressive load of bullhit, I’m sure everyone enjoys it as much as me.

I could literally go on forever but at this point I don’t even care, the original is what matters. Jaime Lannister and Cersei Lannister are not what I saw tonight. I’m literally so done with your fucking rape culture, world. So done you could serve me and eat me.

What you missed on 4x03 of Game of Thrones:

maisiewilliams:

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#got   #spoilers   #lol  

houselannisters:

Yes because jaime would totally rape cersei

the jaime that felt sick at the sound of hearing rhaella targaryen raped

the jaime that also felt sick after he heard of ellia and her babies being brutally murdered

THE JAIME THAT GOT HIS HAND CUT OFF SAVING HIS FRIEND FROM BEING RAPED

THE JAIME THAT SAID HE WOULD RATHER DIE IF HE WAS A WOMAN THAN LET SOMEONE RAPE HIM

THAT JAIME